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From our President

It is an exciting time at the Cary Institute. Our strategic plan is in full implementation, and we are hiring staff and making plans to modernize our facilities. New scientists will strengthen our world-class research program, and investments in conference space, labs, and technology will enable us to continue advancing the science needed for environmental solutions. 

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Wildebeest feed the Mara River

Africa’s Serengeti-Mara ecosystem is home to one of the largest overland animal migrations in the world. Each year, more than a million wildebeest journey between Tanzania and Kenya in search of food and water.

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Natural climate solutions

There are lots of ways that carbon dioxide (CO2) enters and leaves the Earth's atmosphere. Even though the natural movements of CO2 are enormous, all indications are that the total inputs and outputs to the atmosphere were well-balanced before the Industrial Revolution, because the CO2 concentration was not changing very much.

Hurricane Harvey

Hurricanes: enlist nature's protection

Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, which hit in August and September, are estimated to be the most costly ever to make landfall in the United States. The damage they caused calls for a major investment in infrastructure that is resilient to such extreme events.

The Urban Water Innovation Network (UWIN) engages undergraduate researchers to tackle key water management challenges

The Urban Water Innovation Network (UWIN) links researchers across the United States who represent a range of academic disciplines and are intellectually connected by a common interest in solving urban water issues.

emerald ash borer

Stop importing forest pests

Recent news of the discovery of the emerald ash borer in Franklin County and the hemlock woolly adelgid near Lake George crystallizes the threat that imported forest pests pose to the Adirondacks. The emerald ash borer, a small green beetle from Asia, is poised to wipe out all of the ash trees in the region — and potentially North America.

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Climate change economics

In the politically-charged world of climate change, an important paper appeared in Science last month, written by Solomon Hsiang and 11 others, assessing the regional impacts of the projected changes in climate on the economic productivity within the U.S. 

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Long-term Study

We often forget that some of today's obvious and formidable environmental problems were not recognized without tedious long-term studies by dedicated scientists with a hunch.

The answer is blowing in the wind

Most people accept that coal is a dirty fuel: Dirty to mine, dirty to burn, and dirty to dispose of the ash. Already there is a shift away from coal-fired power plants, but they still account for 30% of our electric power nationwide. 

The Cary Institute teams with IBM Research to address Zika

When the Zika virus arrived in Brazil, it went largely unnoticed until infected infants were born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder marked by a small head caused by severe underdevelopment of brain tissue in utero. As the number of Zika-affected babies grew, the World Health Organization moved quickly to declare Zika virus a public health emergency of international concern.

When science informed policy

At any moment, science gives us its best explanation of reality. It proceeds by rigorous tests of hypotheses through observation and experimentation.

7 documented reasons why YOU should care about climate change

The New York Times reports that most Americans believe that our climate is changing, and a majority of them feel that the combustion of coal should be scaled back.  But, what lags in public opinion is the motivation to do very much else about climate change.  Most people don’t think climate change will matter to them.

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SOS: Sucking oxygen out of the sea

Reports that the world’s oceans showed a two percent decline in oxygen content over the past 50 years gathered a lot of press attention a couple of weeks ago. This was not the first time that oceanographers have reported human impacts on the marine environment, and it is not likely to be the last.

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Eugene P. Odum Award for Excellence in Ecology Education: Kathleen Weathers

The Odum Award recognizes outstanding efforts to relate basic ecological principles to human affairs through teaching, outreach, and mentoring.

Regulation–a new dirty word

The White House has decreed that for every new regulation enacted, two existing regulations must be nullified. Regulatory overseers are now assigned to every Federal agency that might consider adding a new regulation. What a mindless way to ensure the health and safety of society.

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Why science matters

A statement by the Presidents, past and present, of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

Appreciate trees this holiday season

Tis the season when many Americans welcome trees into their homes. For millions of us, fresh-cut evergreens are at the heart of Christmas celebrations – a symbol of hope and joy. Sadly, the situation facing America’s trees is neither hopeful nor joyous.

Hudson Data Jam receives grant, partners with Spark Media

The Cary Institute has received $158,549 from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's Hudson River Estuary Grant Program. Funding will support the Hudson Data Jam, an annual competition that melds science, data, and creative expression – with the goal of increasing environmental awareness among students and the community.

Lessons from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

Since the 1960s, scientists have converged on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire to explore how forest ecosystems work.

Chris Solomon, freshwater ecologist, joins Cary Institute

Chris Solomon is the newest addition to the Cary Institute’s scientific staff. 

Strayer and Jones retirement

June 31 marked the retirement of two longstanding members of the Cary Institute’s scientific staff.

Kathie Weathers Hutchinson Chair

Senior Scientist Kathie Weathers was recently named the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Chair in Ecology, in recognition of her achievements advancing freshwater science. 

Supporters corner

Friends turned out for the Ned Ames Honorary Reception and Lecture on June 24. This year’s speaker, President Emeritus Dr. Gene E. Likens, spoke about lessons learned from 50 years of research at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

The Tick Project

The Cary Institute has embarked on an ambitious study that will test environmental interventions with the potential to reduce tick-borne disease in neighborhoods. The goal: to lower Lyme disease rates and protect public health. 

From our President

Understanding the ecology of infectious diseases is critical to protecting public health. In the U.S., tick-borne diseases are becoming more prevalent thanks, in part, to climate change. 

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