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Platypus

Stream insects concentrate pharmaceutical pollution and pass it to predators

Animals that eat bugs in or near streams at risk of being dosed with drugs

Widely used mosquito repellent proves lethal to larval salamanders

By harming mosquito predators, picaridin may help mosquitoes survive

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog

Microorganisms, including potential pathogens, travel from sea to land via fog,

In the eastern US, adult trees adapt and acclimate to local climate

Trees growing in temperate forests in the eastern US show strong adaptation or acclimation to local climate. So reports a new study that analyzed more than 23,000 tree cores to investigate how adult trees respond to changes in climatic conditions.

Thanks to climate change and wetter weather, forest soils are absorbing less methane

Farming, energy production, and landfills produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Forests can remove methane from the atmosphere through the activity of soil bacteria. But increasing precipitation – a symptom of climate change – is making it harder for forest soils to trap greenhouse gases, creating a feedback loop that exacerbates global warming.

New mentoring program brings community members together to study their local watershed

MH-YES immerses Poughkeepsie students, scientists, & high school teachers in stream ecology research

Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US

In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape

Emerald ash borer

Imported forest pests: What are the impacts and who pays?

Imported pests threaten forest health, local economies, and the benefits trees provide to cities and communities.

Hippo waste causes fish kills in Africa’s Mara River

Ecologists have long known that agricultural and sewage pollution can cause low oxygen conditions and fish kills in rivers. A study published today in Nature Communications reports that hippo waste can have a similar effect in Africa’s Mara River, which passes through the world renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve of Kenya, home to more than 4,000 hippos.

Road salt pollutes drinking water wells in suburban New York State

Road salt applied during the winter lingers in the environment, where it can pollute drinking water supplies. A recent study reveals hotspots and landscape features linked to elevated salt in wells.

Rats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, MD

Social and ecological dynamics of neighborhoods influence who mosquitoes bite

biomass

Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutral

A return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. So reports William Schlesinger, President Emeritus of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, in an Insights article published today in the journal Science.

Long-term monitoring is essential to effective environmental policy

Environmental policy guided by science saves lives, money, and ecosystems. So reports a team of eleven senior researchers in Environmental Science & Policy. Using air pollution in the United States as a case study, they highlight the success of cleanup strategies backed by long-term environmental monitoring. 

In urban streams, pharmaceutical pollution is driving microbial resistance

In urban streams, persistent pharmaceutical pollution can cause aquatic microbial communities to become resistant to drugs.

Fire hydrant covered in road salt. Image by Allison Cekala.

US rivers and streams are compromised by increasing salt loads

Human activities are exposing US rivers and streams to a cocktail of salts, with consequences for infrastructure and drinking water supplies.

Lake Mohonk and Mohonk Mountain House in New Paltz, NY

Understanding the world's lakes takes center stage at GLEON 19

More than 240 scientists and researchers from around the world recently descended on the Hudson Valley to strengthen an international partnership aimed at studying and understanding the world’s lakes.

Pharmaceutical pollution accumulates in watersheds

Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life

When it comes to common chemicals in streams, the dose doesn't always make the poison for aquatic life

$2M NSF grant harnesses big data & AI to advance disease prevention

Team to develop tools to map areas at risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks with new NSF grant

Cyanobacterial bloom on Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire

Researchers take to tech to study toxic cyanobacteria with $1.47M NASA grant

With support from a $1.47 million grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Dartmouth, and the University of New Hampshire are developing high-tech tools to monitor cyanobacteria in lakes, predict impending blooms, and identify factors that are degrading water quality.  

Baltimore Ecosystem Study partners with Baltimore City Public Schools

Through a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) is partnering with Baltimore City Public Schools to transform the way that chemistry is taught in the city’s high schools. The innovative approach draws on data gathered by BES to convey how chemistry shapes the local environment.

Sustainable recreational fisheries focus of $1.5 million NSF grant

With support from a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant, Christopher Solomon, an aquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, is co-leading a study assessing links among people, lakes, and fish in the Northern Highland Lake District in Wisconsin, a region where fishing holds tremendous value economically, socially, and culturally. 

Author Rachel Breyta inspects a one-year-old steelhead trout for signs of IHNV exposure.

Tracking the spread of a deadly fish virus in the Pacific Northwest

A recent Ecology and Evolution study is the first to explore how IHNV spreads among juvenile hatchery-raised fish in the Pacific Northwest, where high rates of infection and mortality can occur. 

toilet sampling

In urban Baltimore, poor neighborhoods have more mosquitoes

A new study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology reports that in Baltimore, Maryland, neighborhoods with high levels of residential abandonment are hotspots for tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus). This environmental injustice may leave low-income urban residents more vulnerable to mosquito-borne disease.

Wildebeest feast: Mass drownings fuel the Mara River ecosystem

Each year, more than a million wildebeest migrate through Africa’s Serengeti Mara Ecosystem. While crossing the Kenyan reach of the Mara River, thousands perish. A new study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to reveal how wildebeest drownings impact the ecology of the iconic river.

Inaccurate IUCN range maps leave birds endemic to India’s Western Ghats vulnerable

Range maps used by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) fall short of protecting birds endemic to the Western Ghats, a mountainous biodiversity hotspot in southern India. 

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