Newsroom

well fire

More research, regulation needed before fracking advances in New York

It’s hard to find people who aren’t polarized on the issue of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking,” a process used to extract natural gas from shale rock thousands of feet beneath the Earth’s surface. Millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals are injected underground and natural gas escapes through cracks and fissures in the shale.

Strayer authors primer on Hudson River ecology

As a main artery to Manhattan, the Hudson River is one of the most travelled and researched rivers in the world. 

Teaching ecology and evolution through mud worms

Ecology and evolution are often taught as independent topics in middle and high schools, though the two are intertwined in nature. 

Cary and WAMC debut new radio show

The Cary Institute and WAMC Northeast Public Radio have launched a new radio show called Earth Wise: A look at our changing environment. 

Field notes: Where did all the acorns go?

Paying attention to cycles in acorn production can provide us with valuable information about the world we live in. 

Artist-in-residence: Lynne Cherry

Award-winning author, illustrator, and filmmaker Lynne Cherry is spending a year at Cary Institute as Artist/Writer-in-Residence. 

Cary helps lead effort to protect freshwater

From pollution and development to managing fisheries, society puts a lot of pressure on freshwaters. 

Research Experiences for Undergraduates

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates program provides students with the opportunity to become a part of the Cary community. 

From our President

Cary Institute scientists continue to transmit the best findings of their scientific efforts to help inform the policy process. 

An interview with Steward Pickett

As director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, Pickett leads an ambitious, multi-partner effort looking at how urban areas function as ecosystems. 

Fall Luncheon on the Grounds of the Cary Institute

Seventy-five supporters and perfect weather made our first Fall Luncheon a resounding success. 

Aldo Leopold Society Autumn Celebration 2011

Susan Babcock and Ralph Schmidt hosted this year's event. 

WAMC and Cary Institute debut new radio show

Millbrook, NY – On January 2nd, WAMC Northeast Public Radio and the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies will debut a new radio show called Earth Wise: A look at our changing environment.

x-mas trees

Live, replantable Christmas tree is the best choice

Christmas is only a week away. For those of us celebrating the holiday, many have already installed and adorned the household tree.

tropical forest

Deadly frog disease illustrates dangers of wildlife trade

The forest, normally filled with the chorus of calling frogs, falls silent. Something drops from the trees. And then another. Dead frogs are falling from the canopy.

zebra mussels

More action needed to stop invasive species

Humans have carelessly moved thousands of species outside their native ranges through activities such as transfer of ballast water, release of pets and bait, movement of untreated wood, escapes from agriculture and aquaculture, and deliberate release of species that we thought to be beneficial.

floods

Heavy rains linked to climate change

There was nothing "normal" about the weather in the 2011 growing season. We started out with a tremendously wet spring, making planting vegetables and field crops challenging.

wappinger creek

Flood mitigation requires care

The Hudson Valley was hit hard by repeated flooding over the past few weeks. Homes, businesses, farms, roads and bridges all were badly damaged by near-record floodwaters.

mosquito

Summer storms offer perfect weather for mosquito breeding

We've had a wet stretch of weather. First we were drenched by Irene, then again with Lee. Saturated soils had additional rainy days. And as a result, mosquitoes have been out in droves.

Fate of lakes focus of international meeting in Sunapee, NH

On October 10th-14th, more than a hundred scientists from twenty-four countries will meet at Lake Sunapee to discuss freshwater lakes and reservoirs, including what can be done to keep them healthy in the face of population growth and competing demands.

air pollution

New rule tackles air pollution

We ecologists take a lot of flack for always having depressing news to report. It's not often we get to say there is good news on the environmental front, but those of us concerned with air pollution have certainly had reasons to smile this summer.

Statement to the NYS Assembly on invasive species

Testimony from freshwater ecologist David Strayer on the negative effects of invasive plants and animals and the critical need for legislation to control the spread of destructive species.

glen canyon dam

Colorado River can be revived

At the heart of the Grand Canyon is the river that helped to carve it.

polar bear

Ice loss a growing concern

Strange things are happening at the top of the Earth. Each summer, the Arctic Ocean, which is normally blanketed in floating sea ice, is losing more and more of its ice cover.

chipmunk with ticks

Has warming spread Lyme?

The Lower Hudson Valley has long been considered the epicenter for Lyme disease in New York state. As a result, most Dutchess County residents are well acquainted with the disease.

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