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Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

BarryMeet Barry, the author of our trail reports >>

Notes and Changes since last report

  • This week's trail report covers the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
  • It was 85°F, partly cloudy and calm at 11:45 AM on July 29, 2015.
  • And that was in the shade... the promise of mid 90s got me out early hoping to miss the hottest.
  • Common ringlet and meadow fritillary were each ramping up another brood.

The Trails

  • Behind the Carriage House, green-eyed coneflower was starting to bloom.
  • On the road to the Fern Glen, a large thistle was blooming.
  • At the back of the pond, gold seal had ripening berries.
  • In the poor fen, steeplebush, a native spiraea, was getting pretty.
  • Off the boardwalk, an aster seemed to be blooming early.
  • Near by, was a single blossom of square-stemmed monkey flower .
  • The sundew had stalks since I first noticed it a few weeks ago...
  • But only now was its tiny flower opening.
  • A bigger flower, but farther out, was that of a St. Johnswort.
  • No question about horsebalm except maybe where the name came from.
  • Competition for a mate made for an amusing pile up of Japanese beetles on a sassafras.
  • The week before, spotted jewelweed was happening in the Sedge Meadow Trail, but in the 'Glen it was looking a bit weak.
  • Elderberry berries, however, were plentiful and ripening.
  • It was getting pretty warm by now. Even the painted turtle was staying in the water.
  • The cool shade of the Cary Pines Trail was welcome...
  • Around the junction with the Wappinger Creek Trail - the Appendix, I like to call it - is a sandy hillside overlooking the Creek. Each year I find signs of burrowing bees, but no bees.
  • Next week: the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • Maybe we'll see them then.
Green-headed Coneflower

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 2 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 1 Blue Jay
  • 3 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Tufted Titmouse
  • 2 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 4 American Robin
  • 1 Gray Catbird
  • 2 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Black-throated Green Warbler
  • 1 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 1 Scarlet Tanager
  • 1 Eastern Towhee
  • 5 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Song Sparrow
  • 5 American Goldfinch
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 2 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 1 Blue Jay
  • 3 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Tufted Titmouse
  • 2 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 4 American Robin
  • 1 Gray Catbird
  • 2 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Black-throated Green Warbler
  • 1 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 1 Scarlet Tanager
  • 1 Eastern Towhee
  • 5 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Song Sparrow
  • 5 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 1 Spicebush Swallowtail
  • 6 Cabbage White
  • 2 Clouded Sulphur
  • 1 Eastern Tailed-Blue
  • 23 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 1 Meadow Fritillary
  • 11 Pearl Crescent
  • 9 Common Ringlet
  • 9 Common Wood-Nymph
  • 1 Monarch
  • 1 Northern Broken-Dash
Plants
  • 1 Aster
  • 1 Green-headed coneflower
  • 1 Steeplebush
  • 1 Round-leaved sundew
  • 1 St. Johnswort
  • 1 Thistle

Notes and Changes since last report

  • This week's trail report covers the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • It was 75°F, partly cloudy and windy at 12:30 PM on July 22, 2015.
  • Today was one of those days... I started in the wrong direction, then everything I pointed the camera at ran away, flew away, or was blown away.
  • But, there may have been a new butterfly...
  • And northern broken-dash was ramping up in back Old Hayfield.

The Trails

  • The parking lot at Gifford House was mighty warm, but the view off the end towards the Tenent House was cooling.
  • The invasive bird feeder escapee, Canada thistle was going to seed.
  • A lot of chipping along the side of the front Old Hayfield turned out to be the young of a prairy warbler family.
  • In the Sedge Meadow, spotted jewelweed had started to bloom.
  • Appalachian browns are always along the edge in here.
  • But there were many out in the middle today, and one features below suggested these were the very closely related eyed brown. That would be new here and for me.
  • Blue vervain was blooming.
  • It can be attractive to smaller butterflies like the uncommon mulberry wing.
  • This butterfly has shown up in several locations on the trails this year. The side view was featured last week. Here is the female above; the male lacks the white spots.
  • Something stood out in the leaf litter on the Wappinger Creek trail: the interesting caterpillar of the obscure moth, wavy-lined herterocampa.
  • The green "X" in the middle on the top side along with the reddish head helps distinguish this one.
  • Next week: the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
Immature Prairie Warbler

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Chimney Swift
  • 2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 6 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 1 Blue Jay
  • 3 American Crow
  • 2 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 4 American Robin
  • 7 Gray Catbird
  • 2 Cedar Waxwing
  • 2 Prairie Warbler
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 2 Field Sparrow
  • 3 Song Sparrow
  • 1 Indigo Bunting
Butterflies
  • 2 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 6 Cabbage White
  • 1 Clouded Sulphur
  • 1 American Copper
  • 1 Banded Hairstreak
  • 2 Eastern Tailed-Blue
  • 7 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 11 Pearl Crescent
  • 4 Red Admiral
  • 3 Northern Pearly-eye
  • 7 Eyed Brown
  • 3 Appalachian Brown
  • 2 Common Ringlet
  • 16 Common Wood-Nymph
  • 13 Northern Broken-Dash
  • 6 Mulberry Wing
  • 13 Dun Skipper
Caterpillars
  • 1 Wavy-lined heterocampa
Plants
  • 1 Blue vervain
  • 1 Canada thistle
  • 1 Spotted jewelweed
Moth
  • 1 Snowberry Clearwing
  • 1 White-striped Black

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